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Women going on sex tours look for big bamboos and Marlboro men


Women's sex tourism is especially popular nowadays. Sources state that about 600,000 women come to the countries of the Caribbean Basin every year in search of men's attention and love.

Women's and men's sex tourism are two absolutely different phenomena. Women do not go to bars and sex shows to find new partners; they do not make sex tours as such infrequent events are organized basically for men.

Researchers who studied the phenomenon of sex tourism among women at Caribbean resorts say that this type of a vacation is typical of middle age women either lonely or unhappy about their family life.

While men choose Asia for their sex tourism, women go to Southern Europe (Italy, Greece, Turkey, Croatia and Spain), to the Caribbean Basin (Jamaica, Barbados and the Dominican Republic), Genoa and Kenya in Africa, Bali, Indonesia and Phuket in Thailand to enjoy sex tourism. Nepal, Morocco, Fiji, Ecuador and Costa-Rica are less popular. Thailand, the Dominican Republic and Cuba are the countries that suit for sex tourism of both sexes, male and female.

Seventeen percent of the Jamaican population lives below the poverty line; tourism and farming are the only sources of income there. The airport of Montego Bay is crowded with young men when flights from Canada or London arrive. They come there to meet "milk bottles who must be immediately filled up". This is how they call foreign women with white skin. Locals say that middle age women come to the place in search of "a big bamboo" as the opinion of the sexual power of swarthy men is widely spread all over the world.

Lesbian tourism is just emerging. However, there are several places where women can enjoy it: Mytilini in Greece, Bangkok and Pattaya in Thailand and Bali.

Sex tourism is popular in the third world countries, and the services are quite affordable there. Jamaica travel experts say that the tariffs are meant for the middle class: $30 per an hour and up to $150 for one night. In addition to the tariff, gigolos would love to receive money, watches, shirts and cigarette lighters as presents. Women from the Canadian capital Ottawa are known as the most generous presenters.

Women who enjoy sex tourism are given various names in different countries where they go: Shirley Valentines in Britain, Longtails - in the Bermudas, yellow cabs - in Japan, milk bottles (blondes) and stellas (brunettes) - in Jamaica. In Barbados, female sex tourists are said to be having "the Canadian secretary syndrome".

Men serving female sex tourists also have their names in different countries: kamakia (harpoon for fishing) - in Greece, galebovi (seagull) - in Croatia, sharks - in Costa-Rica, Kuta Cowboys and pemburu-bule (hunters for whites) - in Bali, Marlboro men - in Jordan, bomsas or bumsters - in Gambia, sanky pankies - in the Dominican Republic, grinda hunter - in Ecuador, brichero - in Peru. Men of the Dominican Republic enjoy the reputation of the most professional gigolos.

For many years it has been considered that sex tourism suited men only. But as it turned out, middle age women who are not that fabulous as film stars but have quite enough money desire to have sex and enjoyment during vacations to take a rest from their husbands, children and housekeeping.

Women's sex tourism was first mentioned in the middle of the 19th century in the USA and Turkey. Americans liked to visit North American Indians and European women visited Turks to enjoy sex far from home. There were no sex travels just during the Depression, and the pause lasted until the 1960s. Just few brave women from England, France, Czechoslovakia and the USA went to India, Nepal and Thailand probably to enjoy sex with locals.

Female sex tourism got a new spur together with the second wave of feminism and when tourism began to speedily develop in the 1960s. Canadian women were the first to travel in search of sexual adventures more actively. It is thanks to Canadian women that the Caribbean Islands and hot boys from Jamaica and Barbados grew incredibly popular. In the 1990s, female tourists from Japan and Taiwan joined them and went to the beaches of Bali and Phuket.

Several years ago, two female sociologists from the USA questioned 240 women spending their vacations in Negril and at two similar resorts in the Dominican Republic. They found out that about one third of them had sexual contacts with local young men during their vacations. At that, sixty percent of them agreed that probably the young men made love to them just to get money. All the respondents said they did not pay for the sexual services that men provided during their vacations at resorts. But many of the women explained that they paid money for sex as they treated it as economic aid to the resort staff or even the local economy.

Some of the questioned women said they had started sex tourism by chance but loved to enjoy it regularly. Others say they love sex tourism not merely because of sex but rather because of the care and attention that local men give them. These women are even ready to pay for this type of temporary love.


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